15 Reasons to Date a Physical Therapist

1. They get physical, physical… (case closed)

2. They’re usually fit, athletic, and sporty. Which means they’re sexy.

3. Physical therapy is a noble profession. PTs are compassionate. They really care about their patients. Amongst the other health care professions, physical therapy is not known to be lucrative. Nurses graduating with a bachelor of science sometimes make more than PTs graduating with a doctorate. Physical Therapists do what they do because they want to help people get better.

4. Call them Doctor. Almost all physical therapists in the US graduate with a doctorate now.

5. They give great massages. ;) (Though they’re probably sick of people asking them for massages.)

6. They’re smart. In order to become licensed, they take a ridiculously hard board exam called the NPTE. Their curriculum rival that of medical doctors. Sometimes, physical therapists are smarter than medical doctors and have better bedside manners, hands down.

7.  They’re good listeners. Patients complain to them all the time about their pain and other problems.

8. They’ll be available for you. They don’t work crazy hours, normally just the standard nine to five schedule.

9. They’re logical, practical, and objective because they’re all about evidence-based practice.

10. They don’t have ridiculous loans. Their schooling is shorter than a  medical doctor’s.

11. They’re not as stressed. They make patients feel better and see results at almost every treatment session. Because their patients are happy, they’re happy.

12. They’re great conversationalists. To be a good therapist, you have to know how establish good rapport with patients.

13. They’re patient. They deal with silly requests from other clinicians. All the time.

14. They’ll take you on creative dates. PTs are always thinking of creative ways to treat their patients.

15. They’ll take care of you, keep you healthy, and treat you when you get hurt. You can’t go wrong with dating a physical therapist ;)

A New Mother’s 18 Hour Work Day in America: USA trails world on paid maternity leave and new mothers barely have time to breathe

Some people think that you’re just slacking off when you’re working from home. As a mom (of a newborn) who works full time, slacking off is the last thing I do when I get the occasional “privilege” to work from home (during dangerous snowstorms or Hurricane Sandy).

Here’s my schedule from last Wednesday during a wintry mess when I worked from home:

  • 6:08am: Wake up, brush teeth, use bathroom, drink a glass of water
  • 6:30am: Use the breast pump to extract 5 ounces of breast milk
  • 7:00am: Make breakfast for husband
  • 7:30am: Shovel snow and fail. Condo board did not manage the snow properly. Car inaccessible so can’t drop off baby–must work from home.
  • 8:00am: Request to work from home from 9:00am to 5:00pm, emailed boss a detailed work plan for the day. Request granted.
  • 8:00am: Eat a piece of toast. Feed baby
  • 8:30am: Change baby’s diaper
  • 9:00am: Put baby in crib for nap. Began working until 11:30am
  • 11:30am: Use the breast pump to extract 5 ounces of breast milk while reading and responding to work emails
  • 12:00pm: Feed baby, make lunch for husband. Realized I did not have my coffee yet. Drink water. Eat lunch. Breathe and relax for ten minutes. Play with baby, bounce him to stop his fussing and crying.
  • 1:00pm: Back to work until 3:30pm (in between, baby naps, cries, fusses. I bounce him on my lap while working)
  • 3:30pm: Use the breast pump to extract 5 ounces of breast milk while checking work emails
  • 4:00pm: Feed baby before changing his diaper again
  • 4:00pm: Back to work until 5:00pm
  • 5:00pm: Wash all dishes from the day, do other chores
  • 6:00pm: Prepare dinner. No time to cook. Not much left in the fridge. Eat leftovers and takeout. Take shower
  • 7:30pm: Use the breast pump to extract 5 ounces of breast milk
  • 8:00pm: Feed baby, play with him, read to him until 9:30pm. Change his diaper. He will nap until midnight
  • 9:30pm to 11:30pm: Finally some free time. Check personal emails, Facebook, blog, spend time with husband, watch some TV before using the breast pump to extract 5 ounces of breast milk
  • 12:00am: Feed baby, change his diaper one last time, put him to sleep, brush my teeth, and go to sleep like a baby myself a little before 1:00am (wake up again at 6am the next day. The cycle continues from Monday to Friday, different when I’m shuffling into the office and pumping milk at work, but equally tiring. On the weekends, the only difference is that I don’t have to work.)

That’s my 18+ hour day as a mom who works full-time and has the occasional “privilege” of working from home. Here in America, new mothers barely have time to breathe, especially if they have to work as well. Our maternity leave benefits are absolutely atrocious. During my maternity leave from October 8th, 2013 to January 29th, 2014, I exhausted my sick days and used five personal days and three vacation days. At the end of January,  I received a short-term disability check for approximately eight hundred dollars. On most days for lunch, I ate TV dinners or my husband’s leftovers to save money. Before my newborn turned four months old, I left him with a heavy heart to return to working full time.

Becoming a mother, I now have newfound appreciation for all mothers out there. We really are superwomen.

Mama does this for you, Philly.

Dear Philly, Mama loves you

photoPhilly,

Mama has loved you since last February on Valentine’s Day when she discovered that you were just a little bean in her tummy. Back then, Mama didn’t know if you were a beautiful boy or girl. Mama carried you for nine months and never felt alone with you swimming in her belly. Gaining more than forty pounds was okay. Mama happily carried you, a healthy and energetic baby. She had never felt more feminine or beautiful as a woman.

In March, Mama took you to Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia where she worked for the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Then in April, you flew together to Tokyo and Hong Kong. You had a little taste of the freshest sashimi and the best tempura. Mama couldn’t hold down any of her food for the first three months: shark fin soup, abalone, real wonton soup, golden egg tarts, a lobster the size of a miniature poodle–you had a little taste of everything (not the poodle) before you were even born. In July, you went to Minneapolis where Mama accepted an award from the National Association of Health Care Recruiters, proudly rubbing her belly on stage. In September, her CEO recognized her in front of more than three hundred rehabilitation therapists. Even in utero, you loved the limelight.

Carrying you, Mama felt like an amazing woman, one who can accomplish anything. None of her accomplishments could compare to giving birth to you, beloved Philly. Mama endured Pitocin-induced contractions for seven hours before begging her nurse for an epidural. Twenty hours  later, you came into the world via a c-section. When the anesthesia wore off and she finally held you, you two have never been apart.

Until now. Sorry, dearest Philly. Mama doesn’t want to leave you, but here in America, she has no choice. If she doesn’t work full-time, she’ll have to give up your home. She won’t be able to put aside money for you to go to college. She won’t be able to give you a life you deserve, here in America where her taxes pay for other parents to stay at home and have dozens of children.

When Mama takes the train to work every morning, she will think about you and wonder if you’re still sleeping. When Mama uses the breast pump in her office, she will close her eyes and imagine that you’re in her arms as she’s feeding you. At lunch, she will call and hope to hear your voice, even though you are a stingy babbler. On the ride home, she will power-sleep, so she can come home and spend approximately six wonderful hours with you before both of you sleep for the night. Every day at work, she will try her best not to cry. If she has to cry, she’ll close her office door and turn on Pandora. Missing you will break her heart, but she’ll be strong. She’ll treasure the time she gets to spend with you when she’s at home and during the weekends.

Mama will probably miss many of your milestone moments. Your first word. The first time you sit unsupported. The first time you pass a toy from one hand to the other. The first time you stand. Maybe even your first steps. Mama will make sure those moments will be recorded, and Mama will watch those recordings over and over again.

Dearest Philly, you may not remember these moments when we’re apart, but Mama will. Mama will remember napping next to you, seeing your happy, chubby face. Mama will remember your soft hair, your beautiful smile, and Mama will even miss hearing you cry. Yes, even that loud wailing that you do in the middle of the night. If Mama could, Mama would choose to be with you longer and watch you grow and change, day by day. In the wild, an orca mama whale nurses her newborn for at least a year. Mama only had a little more than three months with you after you were born.

And those were wonderful and unforgettable months, albeit too short.

Just know this, Philly, even when Mama’s not with you, Mama loves you, now and forever. If it were up to Mama, you would be with her 24/7, as you should be during your first year of life.

~*~

In Canada, Kat’s home country, moms get 50 weeks of maternity leave at up to 45% pay.

In Serbia, moms receive 52 weeks of maternity leave at 100% pay. So do moms in Denmark. In Britain, moms receive 52 weeks of maternity leave at 90% pay.

Moms in Sweden receive 60 weeks of maternity leave at 80% pay.

You’d think it’s bad in France where moms receive only 16 weeks of maternity leave at 100% pay. It’s not as bad as it is in the land of the free and home of the brave.

In America, Kat used up two weeks of sick days and one week of vacation days. She still hasn’t received her short-term disability pay checks yet (three weeks worth at ~$107 per week.) For the last 12 weeks, she’s been on unpaid maternity leave (Family Medical Leave Act). Go figure.

http://www.amazon.com/Kat-Lieu/e/B003U1T7SC

My Cup of Tea: Summer of Love Book Trailer

Buy the book here: http://www.amazon.com/My-Cup-Tea-Summ…

NEW ADULT ROMANTIC COMEDY

It’s another suck-tastic summer for book nerd and baker, Sara Lee-Affen. She’s broke, she’s single, and she’ll probably die a virgin. At her beautiful cousin’s wedding, Sara meets a sexy and delicious stud muffin, Ian Forrests. He’s totally her cup of tea, that is until he laughs at her misery when a bee burrows into her ear. Yes, a dang bee. She’s dying (well not really) as he’s dying from laughter.

What a jerk. A smoking hot, Adonis of a jerk with strikingly green eyes, dark hair, and drool-worthy pecs and eight-pack abs. As luck and fate would have it, Sara keeps bumping into Ian all summer long and ends up working for him as a pastry chef at his failing bakery. Despite her better judgment, Sara falls for the sexy, badass rich boy. She discovers the truth about Ian: he’s a tortured soul who’s still pining for his girlfriend, Sarah. One look at Sarah’s picture and poor Sara knows that she could never compete. Yes, Sara can’t even compete with a dead girl, as she could never be Ian’s cup of tea.
Or could she? Will this be a summer of love or a summer of heartbreak for Sara? Find out in MY CUP of TEA!

My Cup of Tea: Summer of Love, completely rewritten and out world-wide!

It’s another suck-tastic summer for book nerd and baker, Sara Lee-Affen. She’s broke, she’s single, and she’ll probably die a virgin. At her beautiful cousin’s wedding, Sara meets a sexy and delicious stud muffin, Ian Forrests. He’s totally her cup of tea, that is until he laughs at her misery when a bee burrows into her ear. Yes, a dang bee. She’s dying (well not really) as he’s dying from laughter.

What a jerk. A smoking hot, Adonis of a jerk with strikingly green eyes, dark hair, and drool-worthy pecs and eight-pack abs. As luck and fate would have it, Sara keeps bumping into Ian all summer long and ends up working for him as a pastry chef at his failing bakery. Despite her better judgment, Sara falls for the sexy, badass rich boy. She discovers the truth about Ian: he’s a tortured soul who’s still pining for his deceased girlfriend, Sarah. One look at Sarah’s picture and poor Sara knows that she could never compete. She could never be Ian’s cup of tea.

Or could she?

Note: This version of My Cup of Tea is completely different from the previously published version.
Genre: New Adult Romantic Comedy
Length: Novella, 138 pages
This story unfolds over two volumes. Due to some adult situations and language, this novella is meant for readers 13 years and older. My Cup of Tea, Too will be available Summer 2014.
Other books by Kat Lieu include Maid for Me, and Maid for Me, Too.

redo3(2) copy

Pocket Fetal Doppler, best gift for mommy-to-be’s!

It’s not a secret that the American health care system is flawed. You make an appointment to see a doctor at least a month in advance. When you go see the doctor, you still have to wait for your turn despite having that appointment. As a mommy-to-be, I see my ob-gyn once a month. When I do see her, I’d be lucky to spend ten minutes with her. She has great bedside manners but because she’s so popular, she rushes. She checks my baby’s heartbeats with a fetal doppler. Then sends me off for blood tests or ultrasounds.

Yes I can email and call her at anytime, but every little thing concerns me. I’m a hypochondriac. How’s my baby doing? Why is my belly so small when I’m already five months pregnant? Why are my boobs the size of watermelons? (Not exaggerating, they are heavy, swollen, and can crush the skull of a bear…) Is my baby’s heart beating.
At five months pregnant, I still can’t feel my baby’s movements. I can’t hear his heartbeats.

For Mother’s Day, my amazing husband surprised me when he gave me a pocket fetal doppler (Sonaline B Prenatal Heart Listener) along with ultrasound gel. This machine looks just like the one my ob-gyn uses. Hearing my boy’s heartbeats at home on my bed with my family around me for the first time was one of the most wonderful experiences I’ve had as a mommy-to-be. I definitely recommend all expectant mothers to invest in this product. Heartbeats can be heard as early as nine weeks (or earlier!). Nothing relaxes and relieves me more than being able to hear my boy’s heart beat strongly as he grows inside of me whenever and wherever. Power to mommy-to-be’s stuck in a world of flawed health care systems.